Review

Challenges University students have faced due to Coronavirus crisis in Higher Education within the UK

Keywords

Higher Education

Student

Covid-19 Pandemic

Challenges faced

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic is the greatest global challenge that we have faced since World War I.

Introduction

United Kingdom sees more student recruitment each year than any other country in the world and hosts a total of well over 480,000 international students pursuing higher education in the country as of 2018/19 (acc. HESA).

With over 150 higher education institutes and with over 2 million students pursuing degrees in the country, including foreign as well as students from the country itself, UK is one of the top student hosting destinations in the world and is often referred to as the ‘educational hub’ of the world. The recruitment of international students has steadily been on the rise and all the more so after UK announced a 2 year Post Study Work (PSW) permit in 2019 for all international students that would allow them to work and look for work in the country for up to 2 years from their graduation.

Domicile2014/152015/162016/172017/182018/19
UK
England1,497,6051,511,9351,540,2051,548,2501,556,245
Wales99,20097,58098,48598,435100,995
Scotland164,005165,090169,240170,895173,295
Northern Ireland63,96563,60063,07062,93063,535
Other UK4,3154,1504,1304,0704,135
Total UK1,829,0901,842,3551,875,1251,884,5751,898,205
Non-UK
Other European Union124,590127,340134,835139,150143,025
Non-European Union312,010309,230307,540319,340342,620
Total Non-UK436,600436,570442,375458,490485,645
Not known29550537530115
Total2,265,9802,279,4302,317,8802,343,0952,383,970

Data source link: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb255/figure-8

According to Universities UK, foreign students pursuing higher education in the country contribute a whopping £25 billion to UK’s economy, with an estimated £4.8 billion in tuition fees and £5.4 billion on off campus goods and services. 

But with the emergence of the covid-19 pandemic, a significant crisis has been predicted in the education sector of UK. According to a report by London Economic for UCU, the universities of UK bear the hardest brunt of the pandemic, as it has led to a subsequent reduction in fee and grant income, primarily so in cases of foreign students, who are greatly discouraged by the unstable societal conditions proffered by the untimely surfacing of the pandemic. Due to this the Universities of UK are facing a £2.5 billion hole in funding, which could potentially put 30,000 university jobs at risk.

The study by consultancy London Economics for the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) has predicted that there will be 121,000 fewer international student and 111,000 fewer students from UK itself, with an approximate of each institution losing an average of £20 million in income.

However, the director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, Nick Hillman, insists that, ‘No-one can predict what will happen, nor can we know for certain its full impact on educational institutions. We must not imply … that UK universities are halfway to hell in a handcart when, in reality, every conceivable model of a successful post-Covid and post-Brexit UK economy has our outward-facing universities at its heart. And that is why I agree that our universities need proper support in the months ahead.’

The primary aim of this paper is to highlight the challenges that the students pursuing higher education in the UK face in the course of the Covid-19 crisis.

Background

The coronavirus disease is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, a Baltimore class VI positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is highly transmissible in humans.

With symptoms that primarily consist of shortness of breath, dry cough and fever, the severity of the disease varies from people to people. While some may show mild symptoms or may even remain asymptomatic throughout the course of the infection, others may react critically to the disease, more so in individuals with underlying conditions, and with only 5% of the total affected needing intensive care.

First identified in Wuhan, China, since its advent in late 2019, the virus has now spread to every continent, affecting over 20 million people worldwide and sending billions more into lockdown and compelling government administrations to issue large scale social distancing guidelines and curfews.

The outbreak is undoubtedly one of the biggest and the most unprecedented global health crisis of our time. But aside from being a defining health crisis, the pandemic’s unpropitious effects relay a massive blow to the global economy as well as the education sector of most countries, and the students being the pandemic’s most critical and overlooked sufferers. As the schools and institutions of more than 90% of the world’s enrolled students (more than 1.3 billion youths) were closed in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus, a record number of students are compelled to remain home and in community isolation until this global crisis mends itself, disrupting the education of billions of students worldwide. It is evident that the greatest threats of the pandemic on this particular age group lies outside the hospital.

According to UNESCO’s latest figures, 1,379,344,914 students or 80 percent of the world’s learners are being kept out of educational institutions worldwide, while another 284 million are in some way being affected by localized closures.

Aside from the fact that following and maintaining government issued social distancing guidelines is particularly challenging for this age-group, students are also unable access school-provided provisions, such as lunches, mental health services, living facilities, vaccinations and regular checkups upon which a great number of school goers coming from various familial and financial backgrounds rely on a great deal. The compulsion to remain indoors and to abstain from attending school, will cause them to miss out on several such vital amenities.

Methodological Procedures




⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

Review

Challenges University students have faced due to Coronavirus crisis in Higher Education within the UK

Keywords

Higher Education

Student

Covid-19 Pandemic

Challenges faced

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic is the greatest global challenge that we have faced since World War I.

Introduction

United Kingdom sees more student recruitment each year than any other country in the world and hosts a total of well over 480,000 international students pursuing higher education in the country as of 2018/19 (acc. HESA).

With over 150 higher education institutes and with over 2 million students pursuing degrees in the country, including foreign as well as students from the country itself, UK is one of the top student hosting destinations in the world and is often referred to as the ‘educational hub’ of the world. The recruitment of international students has steadily been on the rise and all the more so after UK announced a 2 year Post Study Work (PSW) permit in 2019 for all international students that would allow them to work and look for work in the country for up to 2 years from their graduation.

Domicile2014/152015/162016/172017/182018/19
UK
England1,497,6051,511,9351,540,2051,548,2501,556,245
Wales99,20097,58098,48598,435100,995
Scotland164,005165,090169,240170,895173,295
Northern Ireland63,96563,60063,07062,93063,535
Other UK4,3154,1504,1304,0704,135
Total UK1,829,0901,842,3551,875,1251,884,5751,898,205
Non-UK
Other European Union124,590127,340134,835139,150143,025
Non-European Union312,010309,230307,540319,340342,620
Total Non-UK436,600436,570442,375458,490485,645
Not known29550537530115
Total2,265,9802,279,4302,317,8802,343,0952,383,970

Data source link: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb255/figure-8

According to Universities UK, foreign students pursuing higher education in the country contribute a whopping £25 billion to UK’s economy, with an estimated £4.8 billion in tuition fees and £5.4 billion on off campus goods and services. 

But with the emergence of the covid-19 pandemic, a significant crisis has been predicted in the education sector of UK. According to a report by London Economic for UCU, the universities of UK bear the hardest brunt of the pandemic, as it has led to a subsequent reduction in fee and grant income, primarily so in cases of foreign students, who are greatly discouraged by the unstable societal conditions proffered by the untimely surfacing of the pandemic. Due to this the Universities of UK are facing a £2.5 billion hole in funding, which could potentially put 30,000 university jobs at risk.

The study by consultancy London Economics for the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) has predicted that there will be 121,000 fewer international student and 111,000 fewer students from UK itself, with an approximate of each institution losing an average of £20 million in income.

However, the director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, Nick Hillman, insists that, ‘No-one can predict what will happen, nor can we know for certain its full impact on educational institutions. We must not imply … that UK universities are halfway to hell in a handcart when, in reality, every conceivable model of a successful post-Covid and post-Brexit UK economy has our outward-facing universities at its heart. And that is why I agree that our universities need proper support in the months ahead.’

The primary aim of this paper is to highlight the challenges that the students pursuing higher education in the UK face in the course of the Covid-19 crisis.

Background

The coronavirus disease is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, a Baltimore class VI positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is highly transmissible in humans.

With symptoms that primarily consist of shortness of breath, dry cough and fever, the severity of the disease varies from people to people. While some may show mild symptoms or may even remain asymptomatic throughout the course of the infection, others may react critically to the disease, more so in individuals with underlying conditions, and with only 5% of the total affected needing intensive care.

First identified in Wuhan, China, since its advent in late 2019, the virus has now spread to every continent, affecting over 20 million people worldwide and sending billions more into lockdown and compelling government administrations to issue large scale social distancing guidelines and curfews.

The outbreak is undoubtedly one of the biggest and the most unprecedented global health crisis of our time. But aside from being a defining health crisis, the pandemic’s unpropitious effects relay a massive blow to the global economy as well as the education sector of most countries, and the students being the pandemic’s most critical and overlooked sufferers. As the schools and institutions of more than 90% of the world’s enrolled students (more than 1.3 billion youths) were closed in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus, a record number of students are compelled to remain home and in community isolation until this global crisis mends itself, disrupting the education of billions of students worldwide. It is evident that the greatest threats of the pandemic on this particular age group lies outside the hospital.

According to UNESCO’s latest figures, 1,379,344,914 students or 80 percent of the world’s learners are being kept out of educational institutions worldwide, while another 284 million are in some way being affected by localized closures.

Aside from the fact that following and maintaining government issued social distancing guidelines is particularly challenging for this age-group, students are also unable access school-provided provisions, such as lunches, mental health services, living facilities, vaccinations and regular checkups upon which a great number of school goers coming from various familial and financial backgrounds rely on a great deal. The compulsion to remain indoors and to abstain from attending school, will cause them to miss out on several such vital amenities.

Methodological Procedures




⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

Review

Challenges University students have faced due to Coronavirus crisis in Higher Education within the UK

Keywords

Higher Education

Student

Covid-19 Pandemic

Challenges faced

Abstract

The covid-19 pandemic is the greatest global challenge that we have faced since World War I.

Introduction

United Kingdom sees more student recruitment each year than any other country in the world and hosts a total of well over 480,000 international students pursuing higher education in the country as of 2018/19 (acc. HESA).

With over 150 higher education institutes and with over 2 million students pursuing degrees in the country, including foreign as well as students from the country itself, UK is one of the top student hosting destinations in the world and is often referred to as the ‘educational hub’ of the world. The recruitment of international students has steadily been on the rise and all the more so after UK announced a 2 year Post Study Work (PSW) permit in 2019 for all international students that would allow them to work and look for work in the country for up to 2 years from their graduation.

Domicile2014/152015/162016/172017/182018/19
UK
England1,497,6051,511,9351,540,2051,548,2501,556,245
Wales99,20097,58098,48598,435100,995
Scotland164,005165,090169,240170,895173,295
Northern Ireland63,96563,60063,07062,93063,535
Other UK4,3154,1504,1304,0704,135
Total UK1,829,0901,842,3551,875,1251,884,5751,898,205
Non-UK
Other European Union124,590127,340134,835139,150143,025
Non-European Union312,010309,230307,540319,340342,620
Total Non-UK436,600436,570442,375458,490485,645
Not known29550537530115
Total2,265,9802,279,4302,317,8802,343,0952,383,970

Data source link: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/sb255/figure-8

According to Universities UK, foreign students pursuing higher education in the country contribute a whopping £25 billion to UK’s economy, with an estimated £4.8 billion in tuition fees and £5.4 billion on off campus goods and services. 

But with the emergence of the covid-19 pandemic, a significant crisis has been predicted in the education sector of UK. According to a report by London Economic for UCU, the universities of UK bear the hardest brunt of the pandemic, as it has led to a subsequent reduction in fee and grant income, primarily so in cases of foreign students, who are greatly discouraged by the unstable societal conditions proffered by the untimely surfacing of the pandemic. Due to this the Universities of UK are facing a £2.5 billion hole in funding, which could potentially put 30,000 university jobs at risk.

The study by consultancy London Economics for the Universities and Colleges Union (UCU) has predicted that there will be 121,000 fewer international student and 111,000 fewer students from UK itself, with an approximate of each institution losing an average of £20 million in income.

However, the director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, Nick Hillman, insists that, ‘No-one can predict what will happen, nor can we know for certain its full impact on educational institutions. We must not imply … that UK universities are halfway to hell in a handcart when, in reality, every conceivable model of a successful post-Covid and post-Brexit UK economy has our outward-facing universities at its heart. And that is why I agree that our universities need proper support in the months ahead.’

The primary aim of this paper is to highlight the challenges that the students pursuing higher education in the UK face in the course of the Covid-19 crisis.

Background

The coronavirus disease is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus, a Baltimore class VI positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is highly transmissible in humans.

With symptoms that primarily consist of shortness of breath, dry cough and fever, the severity of the disease varies from people to people. While some may show mild symptoms or may even remain asymptomatic throughout the course of the infection, others may react critically to the disease, more so in individuals with underlying conditions, and with only 5% of the total affected needing intensive care.

First identified in Wuhan, China, since its advent in late 2019, the virus has now spread to every continent, affecting over 20 million people worldwide and sending billions more into lockdown and compelling government administrations to issue large scale social distancing guidelines and curfews.

The outbreak is undoubtedly one of the biggest and the most unprecedented global health crisis of our time. But aside from being a defining health crisis, the pandemic’s unpropitious effects relay a massive blow to the global economy as well as the education sector of most countries, and the students being the pandemic’s most critical and overlooked sufferers. As the schools and institutions of more than 90% of the world’s enrolled students (more than 1.3 billion youths) were closed in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus, a record number of students are compelled to remain home and in community isolation until this global crisis mends itself, disrupting the education of billions of students worldwide. It is evident that the greatest threats of the pandemic on this particular age group lies outside the hospital.

According to UNESCO’s latest figures, 1,379,344,914 students or 80 percent of the world’s learners are being kept out of educational institutions worldwide, while another 284 million are in some way being affected by localized closures.

Aside from the fact that following and maintaining government issued social distancing guidelines is particularly challenging for this age-group, students are also unable access school-provided provisions, such as lunches, mental health services, living facilities, vaccinations and regular checkups upon which a great number of school goers coming from various familial and financial backgrounds rely on a great deal. The compulsion to remain indoors and to abstain from attending school, will cause them to miss out on several such vital amenities.

Methodological Procedures




⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

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